For children in open adoptions, the toughest challenge may come when a birth parent who’s been visiting or calling suddenly vanishes or drifts away. The trigger can be a move to a new job, a marriage, or a personal problem, such as drugs or alcohol. In some cases, a birth mother may not feel worthy of contact, or she may get the message from the adoptive parents that she’s not welcome.
Open adoption is now the most widely practiced form of adoption in the United States. In an open adoption, identifying information is shared, including names, phone numbers, and email addresses. Additionally, an open adoption includes varying degrees of openness after the adoption process is finalized. This typically includes the exchange of emails, letters, pictures, and phone calls. A fully open adoption also includes in-person visits. Fully open adoptions can also include extended family members, such as birthgrandparents and siblings.
Thankfully, as adoptive families, birth mothers, adopted children and child-placing agencies continued to see the negatives of closed adoption and the positives of open adoption, adoption as a whole began to evolve, and for the better. Today, most adoption agencies allow the birth mother to make most of the decision in the adoption, including how much contact she wants with the adoptive family and the child. It is then the adoption agency’s job to find the appropriate adoptive family for each adoption situation.
Females have statistically been somewhat more likely than males to search for their birth parents, and are far more likely to search for their adopted children. Very often, the reason the infant was put up for adoption in the first place was the birth father's unwillingness to marry or otherwise care for the child. Nevertheless, many birth fathers in this situation have agreed to meet with their grown children decades later.[citation needed]
Many in the adoption community first learned of search and support resources through newspaper articles,[8] the Dear Abby column[9] and various TV shows and movies. Starting in the mid-1980s, many adoptees and their parents first learned about the possibility of reunion on the NBC (later CBS) television program Unsolved Mysteries hosted by Robert Stack. This was under their "Lost Loves" category, the vast majority of which involved closed adoption. More than 100 reunions have occurred as a result of the program, many of those being the adoption-related cases. Reruns of the program (with a few new segments and updates) were also aired on the Lifetime Television cable network until mid-2006, and very briefly on Spike TV in late 2008. In September 2010, the program returned to Lifetime from 4 to 7 pm ET/PT.
Nowadays the birth mother and/or birth father can, and typically do, request some combination of updates, pictures, meetings, a closed adoption, an open adoption, or a semi-open adoption and most adoption agencies and adoption attorneys will fulfill their requests. At the same time, you as the adopting family can decide what you are willing and desirous of doing. Then the adoption agency or adoption attorney will match you and the birth parents based on the comparability of your requests.
Affording Adoption - ArticlesAdoption Financing 101: How to Afford AdoptionWhat You Need to Know About Adoption LoansHow Adoption Grants Can Help Fund Your AdoptionDo You Get Financial Help if You Adopt?How to Fundraise for Adoption2018 Adoption Tax Credit InformationAdoption Disruption Insurance Federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) Adoption LeaveEmployer-Provided Adoption BenefitsProsper Healthcare LendingMore . . .
Semi-open adoption is the practice in which information, generally non-identifying, is shared between adoptive families and birthmothers. Usually semi-open adoption consists of the exchange of letters, photos, and emails, either directly or through a third party. It is not unheard of to have some pre-birth, face-to-face meetings or for the birthparents and adoptive parents to spend time together at the hospital during and after the birth.
Most open adoptions lie somewhere in the middle, according to Grotevant and McRoy, exchanging letters, pictures, and phone calls, and having face-to-face meetings once or twice a year. Whatever their situation, many families report that relatives and friends condemn openness, and voice fears that the arrangement will make the birth parent want the child back.
From the early 1950s when Jean Paton began Orphan Voyage, and into the 1970s with the creation of ALMA, International Soundex Reunion Registry, Yesterday's Children, Concerned United Birthparents, Triadoption Library, and dozens of other local search and reunion organizations, there has been a grass roots support system in place for those seeking information and reunion with family.
Photolistings like the Children’s Heart Gallery and AdoptUSKids are very effective tools for finding families for waiting children. Unfortunately, they can also makes the children vulnerable to negative intrusions into their lives. Please help us protect them. If you recognize any of these children or see them in your community, we ask that you respect their privacy. 

About Family and Friends - ArticlesCan (and Should) a Family Member Adopt My Baby After Delivery?The 16 Most Important People in Your Adoption PlanDealing with Unsupportive Parents and Other Family Members"If I Want to Choose Adoption, Can I Be Forced to Keep My Baby?"Are You Being Pressured to Put Your Baby Up for Adoption? How to Create a Strong Adoption Support SystemHow to Talk About Placing a Child for AdoptionPreparing for How Family Members May React to Your NewsCan a Friend or Someone I Already Know Adopt My Baby?What is the Role of the Birth Grandparents in an Adoption Plan?More . . .
×