Now that the first open-adoption generation is under way, social workers are becoming more aware of the role of siblings in these arrangements. An adoptive child’s relationships with biological siblings need to be taken into account. And two children adopted into the same family may have different degrees of openness with their birth mothers. Openness may also affect decisions about family size.
Children come into foster care through no fault of their own.  They come into care because their parents are not able to safely care for them, not because of something they have done.  When a child first comes into foster care, the goal — or case plan — is typically to reunify the child with their parent once it is safe to do so.  But sometimes parents are not able to provide a safe environment for their children.  As a result, the Court determines it would be better for the child to find an adoptive home. 
Parents may also wonder how to react when kids start voicing their preferences regarding birth parent contact. Letting a young child call the shots in an open adoption is probably a bad idea. (After all, small children don’t get to decide when to visit grandparents or other relatives.) But a child of 12 may be ready to make some decisions about whether or when to meet with birth parents. “The older a child gets, the larger the role they should have,” Grotevant advised.
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